#edtech in higher education – beyond the slogans

One of the main topics of my presentations and the ensuing conversations this week at the University of Mainz and the Teacher Training Institute Berlin/Brandenburg was getting beyond the rhetoric of #edtech and the digital agenda. We had a lot of fun with a one-armed bandit which produces #edtech slogans on the fly – some of these are ridiculous, some quite familiar (unfortunately it is only available in German).

So what is the practice at the present? Our OOFAT study for ICDE looks to capture established uses of technology in higher education. We have been looking to the flexibility and openness of three core processes in higher education – (i) delivery of content and student support, (ii) development of content and assessments and (iii) recognition of learning. A first look at the interim results is sobering, but not surprising.

The cases in the current data set – but we need more – show a high level of flexibility in providing access to content and student support. We also see that many respondents state that much of their content is being developed collaboratively in partnership with external partners. But we see much less openness in terms of use of learner-produced content, and relatively fixed assessment and recognition practices.

But… we would like more participation from higher education leaders, who describe their innovations using our standardised survey. Please contribute so we can get beyond the slogans!

See our survey here (also available on the first page as pdf to download and send by email): https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/OOFATGENERAL

 

 

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